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  11. Important Incubation Factors

When incubating any bird egg it is important to control the same factors of temperature, humidity, ventilation, and egg turning. The chart shown below lists the major incubation factors and the values of each that produces the best incubation conditions for the species of birds shown.

Poor results are most commonly produced with improper control of temperature and/or humidity. Improper control means that the temperature or humidity is too high or too low for a sufficient length of time that it interferes with the normal growth and development of the embryo. Poor results also occur from improper ventilation, egg turning and sanitation of the machines or eggs.

Obtain the best hatch by keeping the temperature at 100 F. throughout the entire incubation period when using a forced-air incubator. Minor fluctuations (less than degree) above or below 100 degrees are tolerated, but do not let the temperatures vary more than a total of 1 degree. Prolonged periods of high or low temperatures will alter hatching success. High temperatures are especially serious.

Humidity is carefully controlled to prevent unnecessary loss of egg moisture. The relative humidity in the incubator between setting and 3 days prior to hatching should remain at 58-60 percent or 84-86 F., wet-bulb. When hatching, the humidity is increased to 65 percent relative humidity or more.

Frequently there is confusion as to how the measurement of humidity is expressed. Most persons in the incubator industry refer to the level of humidity in terms of degrees F., (wet-bulb) rather than percent relative humidity. The two terms are interconvertible and actual humidity depends upon the temperature (F.) as measured with a dry-bulb thermometer. Conversion between the two humidity measurements can be made using a psychrometric table.

Ventilation is very important during the incubation process. While the embryo is developing, oxygen enters the egg through the shell and carbon dioxide escapes in the same manner. As the chicks hatch, they require an increased supply of fresh oxygen. As embryos grow, the air vent openings are gradually opened to satisfy increased embryonic oxygen demand. Care must be taken to maintain humidity during the hatching period. Unobstructed ventilation holes, both above and below the eggs, are essential for proper air exchange.

Eggs must be turned at least 4-6 times daily during the incubation period. Do not turn eggs during the last 3 days before hatching. The embryos are moving into hatching position and need no turning. Keep the incubator closed during hatching to maintain proper temperature and humidity. The air vents should be almost fully open during the latter stages of hatching.

The eggs are initially set in the incubator with the large end up or horizontally with the large end slightly elevated. This enables the embryo to remain oriented in a proper position for hatching. Never set eggs with the small end upward.

The following table lists incubation requirements for various species of fowl.

Species

Incub. Period
(days)

Temp
(F.)

Humidity
(F.)

Do not turn
after

Humidity
Last
3 days

Open vent
more

Chicken

21

100

85-87

18th day

90

18th day

Turkey

28

99

84-86

25th day

90

25th day

Duck

28

100

85-86

25th day

90

25th day

Muscovy Duck

35-37

100

85-86

31st day

90

30th day

Goose

28-34

99

86-88

25th day

90

25th day

Guinea Fowl

28

100

85-87

25th day

90

24th day

Pheasant

23-28

100

86-88

21st day

92

20th day

Peafowl

28-30

99

84-86

25th day

90

25th day

Bobwhite Quail

23-24

100

84-87

20th day

90

20th day

Coturnix Quail

17

100

85-86

15th day

90

14th day

Chukar

23-24

100

81-83

20th day

90

20th day

Grouse

25

100

83-87

22nd day

90

21st day

Pigeon

17

100

85-87

15th day

90

14th day

Measured at degrees F. in a forced-air incubator.

Measured as degrees F. using a wet-bulb thermometer. Use chart to convert to relative humidity.

 
   

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